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Undergraduate Courses

Students in front of Kent

Join us this summer to explore new subjects, delve into a current interest with intense focus, and broaden your powers of perception when you earn college credit with undergraduate courses at the University of Chicago. As a Summer Session student, you can enroll in undergraduate courses drawn from the regular curriculum of the College at the University of Chicago. 

You will have access to the same exceptional educational resources that are available to all students during the regular academic year. All of our classes are taught by distinguished professors and experienced lecturers. In these smaller class settings you will be able to receive personal attention from your professors and get to know other students in your class well.

Details

Courses are three or five weeks long. Read each course listing carefully.

Each summer course, regardless of length, is the equivalent of a full quarter-long (10 week) course, and meets for a least 30 contact hours.

  • See individual course descriptions for prerequisites, if any.

Learn more about Undergraduate Summer Quarter.

Undergraduate courses are open to current College undergraduate students; visiting undergraduate students; and, unless otherwise stated, current high school juniors and seniors.

To search for courses based on your academic interest, check out the course finder.

Courses in Program

20th Century American Short Fiction

This program is currently at capacity during the Extended and Rolling deadlines. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session II

A Brief History of Doom: Ragnarok & Other Apocalypses

*Taught Online*  This course examines the idea of the “end of the world” as conceived in Old Norse, biblical, and other traditions, ancient and modern. Topics to be discussed include visions of the apocalypse and afterlife in Norse Mythology (Snorri’s Edda, The Poetic Edda, The Saga of the Volsungs), the Book of Revelation, Shakespeare’s King Lear, Wagner’s Ring cycle, and Marvel’s Thor franchise.

Session(s)

Session I

Academic and Professional Writing

*Taught Online*  Academics and professionals need advanced writing skills if they are to communicate effectively and efficiently.  In this intensive, pragmatic course, students master the writing skills they need by first studying and then applying fundamental structures of effective writing.  Each week, students meet in a synchronous small-group seminars to discuss each other's papers and then watch asynchronous lecture videos on a new principle.  Discussion, editing, critiques, and rewrites ensure that all students sharpen their ability to writ

Session(s)

Session I

Acting Fundamentals (Session 1)

*Taught Online*  This course introduces fundamental concepts of performance in the theater with emphasis on the development of creative faculties and techniques of observation, as well as vocal and physical interpretation.  Concepts are introduced through directed reading, improvisation, and scene study.

Session(s)

Session I

Acting Fundamentals (Session 2)

*Taught Online*  This course introduces fundamental concepts of performance in the theater with emphasis on the development of creative faculties and techniques of observation, as well as vocal and physical interpretation.  Concepts are introduced through directed reading, improvisation, and scene study.

Session(s)

Session II

America in World Civilization II

*Taught Online*  The American Civ sequence examines America as a contested idea and a contested place by reading and writing about a wide array of primary sources. In the process, students gain a new sense of historical awareness and of the making of America. The course is designed both for history majors and non-majors who want to deepen their understanding of the nation's history, encounter some enlightening and provocative voices from the past, and develop the qualitative methodology of historical thinking. 

Session(s)

Session I

America in World Civilization-III

*Taught Online*  The American Civ sequence examines America as a contested idea and a contested place by reading and writing about a wide array of primary sources. In the process, students gain a new sense of historical awareness and of the making of America. The course is designed both for history majors and non-majors who want to deepen their understanding of the nation's history, encounter some enlightening and provocative voices from the past, and develop the qualitative methodology of historical thinking. 

Session(s)

Session II

Approaches to Digital Humanities Using Python

This program is currently at capacity during the Extended and Rolling deadlines. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session I

Archival Methods and Historical Thinking

In this course, students will be introduced to archival research methods and to the ways in which historians work with and interpret the sources they use in constructing historical narratives and arguments. We will visit Special Collections, explore digital archives, and consider the range of possible sources and archives, from texts held in national government archives to material objects, maps, audio or video recordings, and everything in between.

Session(s)

Session I

Art of the East: China

*Taught Online*  This course is an introduction to the arts of China focusing on the bronze vessels of the Shang and Zhou dynasties, the Chinese appropriation of the Buddha image, and the evolution of landscape and figure painting traditions.

Session(s)

Session I

Beginning Fiction Workshop

*Taught Online*  All writers are exiles wherever they live and their work is a lifelong journey toward a lost land.” So wrote Janet Frame, a singularly talented author who was institutionalized at the age of 21, then saved from a lobotomy only because she won a literary prize.

Session(s)

Session I

Black Holes

*Taught online* White dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, the so-called compact objects, are among the most remarkable object in the universe. Their most distinctive feature which ultimately is the one responsible for their amazing properties is their prodigiously high density.  All compact objects are the product of the final stages of stellar evolution.

Session(s)

Session II

Building the New Venture

*Taught remotely*  This course is designed for undergraduate students with a curiosity about business and particularly entrepreneurship and small business or not-for profit organizations. It is not necessary that students be planning to start a venture in the near or even distant future. Each week will feature a specific entrepreneurial skill. For those who may be interested in starting or running a business or non-profit, this class will provide an essential foundation for the process, skills and resources required as well as the opportunities available.

Session(s)

Session I

Classics of Social and Political Thought I

*Taught Online*  In this course we read and discuss works by classical, medieval, and early modern thinkers that have helped shape, if not set, the terms in which politics and society continue to be argued and imagined. The aims of this course are to wrestle deeply with the texts we are reading and to reflect on the varied forms and historical contexts in which their ideas about life in a political community are presented.

Session(s)

Session I

Classics of Social and Political Thought II

*Taught Online*  This second section of Classics spans the history of Western political thinking from seventeenth-century natural law to eighteenth-century reflections on freedom, government, and commercial society. It is during this period that the modern liberal representative state became a philosophical possibility when the political theories of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke were combined with, and contested by, eighteenth-century discussions of human sociability, governmental rationality, and popular sovereignty.

Session(s)

Session II

Classics of Social and Political Thought III

*Taught Online*  The Classics of Social and Political Thought sequence serves to introduce students to some seminal texts, issues, and problems in the history of social and political theory.

Session(s)

Session III

Comprehensive General Chemistry 1

This is the first in a three-course sequence that is a comprehensive survey of modern descriptive, inorganic, and physical chemistry for students with a good secondary school exposure to general chemistry. We cover atomic and molecular theories, chemical periodicity, chemical reactivity and bonding, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, phase equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and nuclear chemistry. Examples are drawn from chemical, biological, and materials systems.

Session(s)

Session I

Comprehensive General Chemistry 2

This is the second in a three-course sequence that is a comprehensive survey of modern descriptive, inorganic, and physical chemistry for students with a good secondary school exposure to general chemistry. We cover atomic and molecular theories, chemical periodicity, chemical reactivity and bonding, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, phase equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and nuclear chemistry. Examples are drawn from chemical, biological, and materials systems.

Session(s)

Session II

Comprehensive General Chemistry 3

This is the third in a three-course sequence that is a comprehensive survey of modern descriptive, inorganic, and physical chemistry for students with a good secondary school exposure to general chemistry. We cover atomic and molecular theories, chemical periodicity, chemical reactivity and bonding, chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, phase equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, quantum mechanics, and nuclear chemistry. Examples are drawn from chemical, biological, and materials systems.

Session(s)

Session III

Computing for the Social Sciences

*Taught Online*  This is an applied course for social scientists with little-to-no programming experience who wish to harness growing digital and computational resources. The focus of the course is on generating reproducible research through the use of programming languages and version control software. Major emphasis is placed on a pragmatic understanding of core principles of programming and packaged implementations of methods.

Session(s)

Session I

Drama: Embodiment and Transformation

This program is currently at capacity during the Extended and Rolling deadlines. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session I

Econometrics

*Taught Online*  Required of students who are majoring in economics; those students are encouraged to meet this requirement by the end of their third year. This course covers the single and multiple linear regression model, the associated distribution theory, and testing procedures; corrections for heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, and simultaneous equations; and other extensions as time permits. Students also apply the techniques to a variety of data sets using PCs.

Session(s)

Session I

Economic Policy Analysis

*Taught Online*  Building on the tools and methods that are developed in the micro and macroeconomics course work, this course analyzes fiscal and monetary policy and other topical issues. We use both theoretical and empirical approaches to understand the real-world problems.

Session(s)

Session I

Electricity & Magnetism

*Taught Online*  This is a three-course calculus-based sequence  in the fundamentals of physics and represents a full-year's work.  Content  is not repeated from course to course.  Topics include classical mechanics, electricity & magnetism, wave motion, optics, and an introduction to heat and thermodynamics.  All labs must be completed to receive credit for the course.

Session(s)

Session II

Elements of Economic Analysis 1

*Taught in a hybrid model*  This microeconomics course develops the tools economists use to analyze the behavior of markets, the theory of consumer choice, the behavior of firms in response to changing costs and prices, and the interaction of producer and consumer choice.

Session(s)

Session I

Elements of Economic Analysis 2

*Taught Online*  This course examines demand and supply as factors of production and the distribution of income in the economy; it also considers some elementary general equilibrium theory and welfare economics.

Session(s)

Session II

Elements of Economic Analysis 3

*Taught Online*  As an introduction to macroeconomic theory and policy, this course covers the determination of aggregate demand (i.e., consumption, investment, the demand for money); aggregate supply; and the interaction between aggregate demand and supply. We also discuss economic growth, business cycle, inflation and money.

Session(s)

Session I

Experimental Animation: Handmade Motion

*Taught Online*  Experimental Animation: Handmade Motion will introduce fundamental concepts and techniques of animation through a series of exercises and assignments which touch on the history, theory and practice of this dynamic medium. Utilizing a responsive, interactive web-based platform to facilitate lectures, screenings, technical demonstrations, collaborative production processes and direct feedback, students will develop independent and group animations.

Session(s)

Session II

Field Archaeology (Israel)

This course entails four weeks of full-time, hands-on training in field archaeology in an excavation directed by a University of Chicago faculty member. Students will learn techniques of excavation and digital recording of the finds; attend evening lectures; and participate in weekend field trips. Academic requirements include the completion of assigned readings and a final written examination, in addition to the work on the site and in the lab. Students who are enrolled in this course will pay a Summer Session tuition fee in addition to the cost of participation in the dig.

Session(s)

Session III

Field Archaeology (Spain)

This course entails four weeks of full-time, hands-on training in field archaeology in an excavation directed by a University of Chicago faculty member. Students will learn techniques of excavation and digital recording of the finds; attend evening lectures; and participate in weekend field trips. Academic requirements include the completion of assigned readings and a final written examination, in addition to the work on the site and in the lab. Students who are enrolled in this course will pay a Summer Session tuition fee in addition to the cost of participation in the dig.

Session(s)

Session IV

Film and the Moving Image

This program is currently at capacity. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session I

Fundamentals of Computer Programming I: Swift and iOS Application Development

This program is currently at capacity during the Extended and Rolling deadlines. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session I

Game Theory I

This program is currently at capacity during the Extended and Rolling deadlines. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session II

Genre Fundamentals: Fiction

*Taught Online*  What are basics of complex storytelling? What are its conventions and deviations? This course explores fiction by focusing on specific narrative strategies and how they change over time. Authors will most likely include Herman Melville, Henry James, Edith Wharton, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, and Ali Smith, among others.

Session(s)

Session I

Historiography

The course provides a systematic introduction to historical methodology and approaches (e.g., political, intellectual, social, cultural, economic, gender, environmental history), as well as research techniques. Students will gain analytical, research, and writing tools that will assist them in their capstone projects, research colloquia, or BA theses. Assignments: weekly response papers, short presentation and paper, take-home final exam.

Session(s)

Session I

History of Western Civilization 1

*Taught Online*  This sequence fulfills the general education requirement in civilization studies.  The purpose of this three-course sequence is (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought and to provide them with the critical tools for analyzing tests produced in the distant or near past, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of European civilization since the sixth century B.C.E, and (3) to assist them in discovering the developmental connections between these various epochs.

Session(s)

Session I

History of Western Civilization 2

*Taught Online*  This sequence fulfills the general education requirement in civilization studies.  The purpose of this three-course sequence is (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought and to provide them with the critical tools for analyzing tests produced in the distant or near past, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of  European civilization since the sixth century B.C.E, and (3) to assist them in discovering the developmental connections between these various epochs.

Session(s)

Session II

History of Western Civilization 3

*Taught Online*  This sequence fulfills the general education requirement in civilization studies.  The purpose of this three-course sequence is (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought and to provide them with the critical tools for analyzing tests produced in the distant or near past, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of  European civilization since the sixth century B.C.E, and (3) to assist them in discovering the developmental connections between these various epochs.

Session(s)

Session III

Human Development Research Designs

The purpose of this course is to expose Comparative Human Development majors, Sociology majors, Political Science majors, Education and Society minors, and Health and Society minors in College to a broad range of methods in the social sciences with a focus on human development research.

Session(s)

Session II

Introduction to Biological Psychology

*Taught Online*  This course is designed to satisfy the upper division undergraduate core breadth requirement for the undergraduate major in Psychology (PSYC 20300). The material will introduce undergraduate psychology students to the fundamentals of biological psychology and neuroscience. We will concentrate on biological processes which underlie human and animal behavior.

Session(s)

Session II

Introduction to Computer Science 1

Computers are extremely helpful at solving computational problems: problems involving numbers, counting, logic, arranging things, ordering things, manipulating images, solving puzzles, developing game strategies, and so on. This course examines a rich assortment of interesting and increasingly challenging topics, and explores what computer science has discovered about them, and what is yet to be discovered. Our main activity will be programming, and no prior experience in programming will be assumed.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to Development Economics

Taught Online*  This course will help students learn thorough and practical analysis of development policies and programs. More generally, it will help students think about development in a way that is disciplined by economic theory, informed by empirical research and practically connected to policy. During the first half we will construct an analytical framework to guide our study of development.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to GIS and Spatial Analysis for Social Scientists

*Taught Online*  This course provides an introduction and overview of how spatial thinking is translated into specific methods to handle geographic information and the statistical analysis of such information. This is not a course to learn a specific GIS software program, but the goal is to learn how to think about spatial aspects of research questions, as they pertain to how the data are collected, organized and transformed, and how these spatial aspects affect statistical methods.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to Money and Banking

*Taught Online* The course focuses on monetary policy and central bank's attempts to stabilize prices and promote maximum sustainable economic growth. Topics include the structure of the Federal Reserve, the conduct of monetary policy, the term structure of interest rates, risk valuation, management of banking, and financial crises.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology

*Taught Online*  Although mathematics and biology have traditionally not gotten along, recent advances in molecular biology and medicine have made biological experiments essentially quantitative. This course introduces mathematical ideas that are useful for understanding and analyzing biological data, including data description and fitting, hypothesis testing and Bayesian thinking, Markov models, and differential equations.

Session(s)

Session II

Introduction to Religious Studies

*Taught Online*  What is religion? Is it truth or an illusion? Is it an opiate or an effervescent? Is it the origin of civilization or the end of it? Is it some of these things, or none, or all? The task of defining religion has bedeviled scholars for centuries and remains a perennial concern in the academic field of Religious Studies.

Session(s)

Session II

Introduction to the Arts of the Italian Renaissance

*Taught Online*  This course will cover the major themes and works of the Italian Renaissance, including painting, sculpture, decorative arts, and architecture. We will consider stylistic development of the arts from the period of roughly 1300 (late Medieval/pre-Renaissance predecessors) to 1560. Throughout the course we will interrogate the concept of “Renaissance” as a unifying term and examine its relationship to the Medieval in terms of both continuity and change.

Session(s)

Session II

Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia (China)

*Taught Online*  This is a two-course sequence on the civilizations of Japan and China, with emphasis on major transformation of individual identity, community, and nation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present. The China course of the sequence will review the broad characteristics of Chinese civilization from its beginnings, with special emphasis on the social, political, and cultural transformations from the nineteenth century to the present.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia (Japan)

*Taught Online*  This is a two-course sequence on the civilizations of Japan and China, with emphasis on major transformation of individual identity, community, and nation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present. This course of the sequence focuses on Japan from 1600 to the postwar era. The two courses may be taken separately. 

Session(s)

Session II

Introductory Statistical Methods and Applications for the Social Sciences

This program is currently at capacity during the Extended and Rolling deadlines. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session I

Labor Economics

This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis.  Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, creativity over the lifecycle and unemployment.  For each topic we will describe the basic economic framework used in the analysis, analyze associated cases of study and drawn conclusions about what we have learned.  Most of the examples will be taken from U.S.

Session(s)

Session I

Linear Algebra

This course takes a concrete approach to the basic topics of linear algebra.  Topics include vector geometry, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, matrices and determinants, and eigenvalue problems.

Session(s)

Session I

Mechanics

*Taught Online*  This is a three-course calculus-based sequence  in the fundamentals of physics and represents a full-year's work.  Content  is not repeated from course to course.  Topics include classical mechanics, electricity & magnetism, wave motion, optics, and an introduction to heat and thermodynamics.  All labs must be completed to receive credit for the course. Final exams are held on the last Wednesday of each course.  PHYS 13100 and 13200 count toward the general education requirement in the natural and mathematical sciences.

Session(s)

Session I

Nutritional Science

This program is currently at capacity during the Extended and Rolling deadlines. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session I

Principles of Biology

This program is currently at capacity during the Extended and Rolling deadlines. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session III

Principles of Macroeconomics

The course will cover - via theory and basic economic reasoning, as well as contemporary applications and public policy debates - current major U.S. domestic and international macroeconomics issues, including: the determination of income and output, inflation, and unemployment; the money supply, banking system, and the Federal Reserve; federal spending, taxation and deficits; international trade, exchange rates, the balance of payments and globalization; and long-run population and economic growth.

Session(s)

Session I

Principles of Microeconomics

The course treats by way of economic theory, quantification, data, applications, and contemporary issues: (a) the behavior and decision making on the part of individuals, business firms, and the government; and (b) the role of choices, tradeoffs, costs, prices, incentives and markets in the American economy. Special attention will be paid to the contributions of Chicago economists/economics to our understanding of microeconomic principles and public policy.

Session(s)

Session I

Psychological Research Methods

*Taught Online*  This course introduces concepts and methods used in behavioral research. Topics include the nature of behavioral research, testing of research ideas, quantitative and qualitative techniques of data collection, artifacts in behavioral research, analyzing and interpreting research data, and ethical considerations in research.
 

Session(s)

Session I

Quantitative Portfolio Management and Algorithmic Trading

The University of Chicago welcomes students with strong quantitative skills to explore opportunities in the field of Financial Math. This course for current undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students in Quantitative Portfolio Management and Algorithmic Trading provides a rigorous introduction to modern applications in Financial Math through an interdisciplinary curriculum delivered via remote instruction by lecturers and industry experts affiliated with the Financial Math MS program at UChicago.

Session(s)

Session I

Self, Culture and Society 1

*Taught Online*  The “Self, Culture, and Society” sequence introduces students to a broad range of social scientific theories and methodologies that deepen their understanding of basic problems of cultural, social, and historical existence. The first “quarter” deals with the conceptual foundations of political economy and theories of capitalism and meaning in modern society.

Session(s)

Session I

Self, Culture and Society 2

*Taught Online*  The “Self, Culture, and Society” sequence introduces students to a broad range of social scientific theories and methodologies that deepen their understanding of basic problems of cultural, social, and historical existence. The sequence starts with the conceptual foundations of political economy and theories of capitalism and meaning in modern society.

Session(s)

Session II

Self, Culture and Society 3

*Taught Online*  The “Self, Culture, and Society” sequence introduces students to a broad range of social scientific theories and methodologies that deepen their understanding of basic problems of cultural, social, and historical existence. The sequence starts with the conceptual foundations of political economy and theories of capitalism and meaning in modern society. Students then consider the cultural and social constitution of the self, foregrounding the exploration of sexuality, gender, and race.

Session(s)

Session III

Stars

*Taught Online* At the beginning of the 20th century, two astronomers:  Ejnar Hertzprung and Henry Norris Russell independently took catalogues of stars and plotted their brightness as a function of their color. The result, now known as the HR diagram, was to become one of the most influential diagrams in astrophysics. It showed that, contrary to one's naive expectation, the distribution of stars was highly structured.

Session(s)

Session I

Statistical Methods and Applications

*Taught Online*  This course introduces statistical techniques and methods of data analysis. including the use of statistical software. Examples are drawn from the biological, physical, and social sciences. Students are required to apply the techniques discussed to data drawn from actual research.

Session(s)

Session I

Survey Data Analysis

This course overviews the way scientific surveys are conducted, the survey data structure, and common techniques to analyze survey data. Students will explore the actual survey data (using major surveys such as the General Social Survey) and look for answers to their research question. Students will learn where to find information about survey data sources and how to conduct analyses for their research project. The course also introduces some online tools and statistical software.

Session(s)

Session I

The Workings of the Human Brain: From Brain to Behavior

This program is currently at capacity during the Extended and Rolling deadlines. If you select this course as a first choice on your application, please apply for a second option that fulfills your interests.

Session(s)

Session II

Virtual Ethnographic Field Research Methods 

*Taught Online*  “Virtual worlds are places of imagination that encompass practices of play, performance, creativity and ritual.” – Tom Boellstorff, from Ethnography and Virtual Worlds: A Handbook of Method

Session(s)

Session I

Visual Language: On Images (Section 92)

*Taught Online*  Through studio work and critical discussions on 2D form, this course is designed to reveal the conventions of images and image-making. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but they are also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content.

Session(s)

Session II

Visual Language: On Images (Section 93)

*Taught Online*  Through studio work and critical discussions on 2D form, this course is designed to reveal the conventions of images and image-making. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but they are also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content. Topics as varied as, but not limited to, illusion, analogy, metaphor, time and memory, nature and culture, abstraction, the role of the author, and universal systems can be illuminated through these primary investigations.

Session(s)

Session II

Visual Language: On Images (Session 1)

Through studio work and critical discussions on 2D form, this course is designed to reveal the conventions of images and image-making. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but they are also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content. Topics as varied as, but not limited to, illusion, analogy, metaphor, time and memory, nature and culture, abstraction, the role of the author, and universal systems can be illuminated through these primary investigations.

Session(s)

Session I

Waves, Optics & Heat

*Taught Online*  This is a three-course calculus-based sequence  in the fundamentals of physics and represents a full-year's work.  Content  is not repeated from course to course.  Topics include classical mechanics, electricity & magnetism, wave motion, optics, and an introduction to heat and thermodynamics.  All labs must be completed to receive credit for the course. Final exams are held on the last Wednesday of each course.   

Session(s)

Session III