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Undergraduate Courses

Students in front of Kent

Join us this summer to explore new subjects, delve into a current interest with intense focus, and broaden your powers of perception when you earn college credit with undergraduate courses at the University of Chicago. As a Summer Session student, you can enroll in undergraduate courses drawn from the regular curriculum of the College at the University of Chicago. 

You will have access to the same exceptional educational resources that are available to all students during the regular academic year. All of our classes are taught by distinguished professors and experienced lecturers. In these smaller class settings you will be able to receive personal attention from your professors and get to know other students in your class well.

Details

Courses are three or five weeks long. Read each course listing carefully.

Each summer course, regardless of length, is the equivalent of a full quarter-long (10 week) course, and meets for a least 30 contact hours.

  • See individual course descriptions for prerequisites, if any.

Learn more about Undergraduate Summer Quarter.

Undergraduate courses are open to current College undergraduate students; visiting undergraduate students; and, unless otherwise stated, current high school juniors and seniors.

To search for courses based on your academic interest, check out the course finder.

Courses in Program

20th Century American Short Fiction

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course presents America's major writers of short fiction in the 20th century.  We will begin with Willa Cather's "Paul's Case" in 1905 and proceed to the masters of High Modernism, Hemingway, Fitzgerals, Faulkner, Porter, Welty, Ellison, Nabokov, on through the next generation, o'Connor, Pynchon, Roth, Mukherjee, Coover, Carver, and end with more recent work by Danticat, Tan and the microfictionists.  Our initial effort with each text will be close reading, from which we will move out to consider questions of

Session(s)

Session II

A Brief History of Doom: Ragnarok & Other Apocalypses

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course examines the idea of the “end of the world” as conceived in Old Norse, biblical, and other traditions, ancient and modern. Topics to be discussed include visions of the apocalypse and afterlife in Norse Mythology (Snorri’s Edda, The Poetic Edda, The Saga of the Volsungs), the Book of Revelation, Shakespeare’s King Lear, Wagner’s Ring cycle, and Marvel’s Thor franchise.

Session(s)

Session I

Academic and Professional Writing

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  Academics and professionals need advanced writing skills if they are to communicate effectively and efficiently.  In this intensive, pragmatic course, students master the writing skills they need by first studying and then applying fundamental structures of effective writing.  Each week, students meet in a synchronous small-group seminars to discuss each other's papers and then watch asynchronous lecture videos on a new principle.  Discussion, editing, critiques, and rewrites ensure that all students sharpen their

Session(s)

Session I

Acting Fundamentals (Session 1)

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course introduces fundamental concepts of performance in the theater with emphasis on the development of creative faculties and techniques of observation, as well as vocal and physical interpretation.  Concepts are introduced through directed reading, improvisation, and scene study.

Session(s)

Session I

Acting Fundamentals (Session 2)

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course introduces fundamental concepts of performance in the theater with emphasis on the development of creative faculties and techniques of observation, as well as vocal and physical interpretation.  Concepts are introduced through directed reading, improvisation, and scene study.

Session(s)

Session II

America in World Civilization II

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  The American Civ sequence examines America as a contested idea and a contested place by reading and writing about a wide array of primary sources. In the process, students gain a new sense of historical awareness and of the making of America. The course is designed both for history majors and non-majors who want to deepen their understanding of the nation's history, encounter some enlightening and provocative voices from the past, and develop the qualitative methodology of historical thinking. 

Session(s)

Session I

America in World Civilization-III

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  The American Civ sequence examines America as a contested idea and a contested place by reading and writing about a wide array of primary sources. In the process, students gain a new sense of historical awareness and of the making of America. The course is designed both for history majors and non-majors who want to deepen their understanding of the nation's history, encounter some enlightening and provocative voices from the past, and develop the qualitative methodology of historical thinking. 

Session(s)

Session II

Beginning Poetry Workshop: Composition

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  At its root, the verb compose means to "put together," so in this course we will explore poetic composition as the practice of putting words together in ways that help us compose, discompose, and recompose parts of our lives. Our basic premise will be that poetry offers useful forms of attention and construction, so that to write is to observe the world and to fashion ways of living in it.

Session(s)

Session I

Black Holes

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  White dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, the so-called compact objects, are among the most remarkable object in the universe. Their most distinctive feature which ultimately is the one responsible for their amazing properties is their prodigiously high density.  All compact objects are the product of the final stages of stellar evolution.

Session(s)

Session II

Classics of Social and Political Thought I

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  In this course we read and discuss works by classical, medieval, and early modern thinkers that have helped shape, if not set, the terms in which politics and society continue to be argued and imagined. The aims of this course are to wrestle deeply with the texts we are reading and to reflect on the varied forms and historical contexts in which their ideas about life in a political community are presented.

Session(s)

Session I

Classics of Social and Political Thought II

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This second section of Classics spans the history of Western political thinking from seventeenth-century natural law to eighteenth-century reflections on freedom, government, and commercial society. It is during this period that the modern liberal representative state became a philosophical possibility when the political theories of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke were combined with, and contested by, eighteenth-century discussions of human sociability, governmental rationality, and popular sovereignty.

Session(s)

Session II

Classics of Social and Political Thought III

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  The Classics of Social and Political Thought sequence serves to introduce students to some seminal texts, issues, and problems in the history of social and political theory.

Session(s)

Session IV

Computing for the Social Sciences

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This is an applied course for social scientists with little-to-no programming experience who wish to harness growing digital and computational resources. The focus of the course is on generating reproducible research through the use of programming languages and version control software. Major emphasis is placed on a pragmatic understanding of core principles of programming and packaged implementations of methods.

Session(s)

Session I

Contemporary Dance Practices

This hybrid studio/seminar course offers an overview of the formal techniques, cultural contexts, and social trends that shape current dance practices. Through both scholarly and practical approaches to course content, students will gain a working knowledge of a wide range of formal and aesthetic approaches to dance. Other topics include the influence of pop culture, the role of cultural appropriation, and the privileging of Western-based perspectives within dance presentation, education, scholarship, and criticism.

Session(s)

Session I

Core Biology

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  What is life? How does it work and evolve? This course uses student-centered interactive learning in the lab, assigned readings from both the popular press and primary scientific literature, and directed writing exercises to explore the nature and functions of living organisms, their interactions with each other, and their environment.

Session(s)

Session II

Drama: Embodiment and Transformation

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course seeks to develop an appreciation and understanding of a variety of processes by which dramatic scripts are theatrically realized, with an emphasis on the text’s role in theatrical production rather than as literature. Students will learn a range of theatrical concepts and techniques, including script analysis and its application to staging, design and acting exercises. Students will be required to act, direct, and design.

Session(s)

Session I

Econometrics

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  Required of students who are majoring in economics; those students are encouraged to meet this requirement by the end of their third year. This course covers the single and multiple linear regression model, the associated distribution theory, and testing procedures; corrections for heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, and simultaneous equations; and other extensions as time permits. Students also apply the techniques to a variety of data sets using PCs.

Session(s)

Session I

Economic Policy Analysis

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  Building on the tools and methods that are developed in the micro and macroeconomics course work, this course analyzes fiscal and monetary policy and other topical issues. We use both theoretical and empirical approaches to understand the real-world problems.

Session(s)

Session I

Electricity & Magnetism

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This is a three-course calculus-based sequence  in the fundamentals of physics and represents a full-year's work.  Content  is not repeated from course to course.  Topics include classical mechanics, electricity & magnetism, wave motion, optics, and an introduction to heat and thermodynamics.  All labs must be completed to receive credit for the course.

Session(s)

Session II

Elementary Logic

*Taught Online for Summer 2021 An introduction to the concepts and principles of symbolic logic. We learn the syntax and semantics of truth-functional and first-order quantificational logic, and apply the resultant conceptual framework to the analysis of valid and invalid arguments, the structure of formal languages, and logical relations among sentences of ordinary discourse.

Session(s)

Session I

Elements of Economic Analysis 1

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This microeconomics course develops the tools economists use to analyze the behavior of markets, the theory of consumer choice, the behavior of firms in response to changing costs and prices, and the interaction of producer and consumer choice.

Session(s)

Session I

Elements of Economic Analysis 2

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course examines demand and supply as factors of production and the distribution of income in the economy; it also considers some elementary general equilibrium theory and welfare economics.

Session(s)

Session III

Elements of Economic Analysis 3

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  As an introduction to macroeconomic theory and policy, this course covers the determination of aggregate demand (i.e., consumption, investment, the demand for money); aggregate supply; and the interaction between aggregate demand and supply. We also discuss economic growth, business cycle, inflation and money.

Session(s)

Session I

Experimental Animation: Handmade Motion

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  Experimental Animation: Handmade Motion will introduce fundamental concepts and techniques of animation through a series of exercises and assignments which touch on the history, theory and practice of this dynamic medium. Utilizing a responsive, interactive web-based platform to facilitate lectures, screenings, technical demonstrations, collaborative production processes and direct feedback, students will develop independent and group animations.

Session(s)

Session I

Film and the Moving Image

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and interpretation when dealing with film and other moving image media. It encourages the close analysis of audiovisual forms, their materials and formal attributes, and explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given film or moving image text. It also examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study and understanding of moving images.

Session(s)

Session I

Fundamentals of Computer Programming I: Swift and iOS Application Development

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course introduces computer programming using the Swift programming language. The emphasis is on fundamental concepts, including logic, functions, data structures and program design. The course will end with a discussion of iOS application development, though that is not its focus, and the extent to which it is covered will depend on factors such as the availability of technology.    

Session(s)

Session I

Game Theory and Economic Applications

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course introduces the basic ideas and applications of game theory. Topics include models of games in extensive and strategic form, equilibria with randomization, signaling and beliefs, reputation in repeated games, bargaining games, investment hold-up problems, and mediation and incentive constraints.

Session(s)

Session I

Game Theory I

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  The origins of game theory in political science reach back to the arms race at the height of the cold war. Since then, it’s applications in political science have proliferated to explaining regime transitions, civil war conduct, and even climate change.

Session(s)

Session II

Genre Fundamentals: Fiction

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course offers an introduction to the fundamentals of narrative fiction. Together, we will ask: what are the basics of complex storytelling? what are its conventions and deviations?

Session(s)

Session I

Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course presents the science behind the forecast of global warming to enable the student to evaluate the likelihood and potential severity of anthropogenic climate change in the coming centuries. It includes an overview of the physics of the greenhouse effect, including comparisons with Venus and Mars; predictions and reliability of climate model forecasts of the greenhouse world. This course is part of the College Course Cluster program, Climate Change, Culture, and Society.

Session(s)

Session I

Gourmet Biology: Exploring Relationships between Human Nutrition, Food & Biodiversity

Taught Online for Summer 2021*  Human omnivorous nature has allowed us to fulfill our caloric requirements eating a large diversity of organisms. The neurological perception of food - taste, smell, texture, and appearance - highly influences our nutrition. It also contributes to our instinct for experimenting constantly with new combinations of ingredients and ways of cooking. Everywhere humans have travelled and settled, we have established close relationships with the local biodiversity to identify food sources.

Session(s)

Session I

History of Western Civilization 1

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This sequence fulfills the general education requirement in civilization studies.  The purpose of this three-course sequence is (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought and to provide them with the critical tools for analyzing tests produced in the distant or near past, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of European civilization since the sixth century B.C.E, and (3) to assist them in discovering the developmental connections between these variou

Session(s)

Session I

History of Western Civilization 2

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This sequence fulfills the general education requirement in civilization studies.  The purpose of this three-course sequence is (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought and to provide them with the critical tools for analyzing tests produced in the distant or near past, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of  European civilization since the sixth century B.C.E, and (3) to assist them in discovering the developmental connections between these vario

Session(s)

Session II

History of Western Civilization 3

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This sequence fulfills the general education requirement in civilization studies.  The purpose of this three-course sequence is (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought and to provide them with the critical tools for analyzing tests produced in the distant or near past, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of  European civilization since the sixth century B.C.E, and (3) to assist them in discovering the developmental connections between these vario

Session(s)

Session IV

Introduction to Biochemistry

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course is an introductory biochemistry course, intended to provide basic knowledge of chemical processes underlying cellular metabolism.  It examines in plants and animals the chemical nature of cellular components, enzyme kinetics, mechanism of enzyme activity, energy interconversions, and biosynthetic reactions, including template-dependent processes and some aspects of metabolic control mechanisms.  The course also includes a laboratory.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to Biological Psychology

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course is designed to satisfy the upper division undergraduate core breadth requirement for the undergraduate major in Psychology (PSYC 20300). The material will introduce undergraduate psychology students to the fundamentals of biological psychology and neuroscience. We will concentrate on biological processes which underlie human and animal behavior.

Session(s)

Session II

Introduction to Computer Programming

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course provides an introduction to computer programming and computational concepts using the Python programming language.

Session(s)

Session IV

Introduction to Computer Science 1

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  Computers are extremely helpful at solving computational problems: problems involving numbers, counting, logic, arranging things, ordering things, manipulating images, solving puzzles, developing game strategies, and so on. This course examines a rich assortment of interesting and increasingly challenging topics, and explores what computer science has discovered about them, and what is yet to be discovered. Our main activity will be programming, and no prior experience in programming will be assumed.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to Computer Science 2

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course provides an introduction to computer programming and computer science in the C programming language.  Topics include control structures, function definition, iteration and recursion, pointers, memory layout and management, and data structure design.  CMSC 15200 is a suitable second course for students who have just taken CMSC 15100 in the summer.  However, and only in the summer, CMSC 15200 can be taken as a standalone introduction to computer science, for students in any area who require related skill

Session(s)

Session III

Introduction to GIS and Spatial Analysis for Social Scientists

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course provides an introduction and overview of how spatial thinking is translated into specific methods to handle geographic information and the statistical analysis of such information. This is not a course to learn a specific GIS software program, but the goal is to learn how to think about spatial aspects of research questions, as they pertain to how the data are collected, organized and transformed, and how these spatial aspects affect statistical methods.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to Health and Society II

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  What can the social sciences teach us about the ongoing coronavirus pandemic or the opioid epidemic of the past decade? How can we understand the sources of inequalities in access to care and in health outcomes across populations, both in the United States and globally? What is the significance of varying experiences of illness, categories of disorder, ideals of well-being, and forms of intervention across cultural settings and historical periods?

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to Managerial Microeconomics

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course presents several classic microeconomic models applicable in business contexts. The topics covered include self-selection, commitment, product differentiation, matching, and mechanism design, among others. The theoretical insights of each model are analyzed. Real-world applicability is discussed using practical examples. Students are required to write short papers applying the models presented in the course to real-world situations in the context of business.
 

Session(s)

Session III

Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  Although mathematics and biology have traditionally not gotten along, recent advances in molecular biology and medicine have made biological experiments essentially quantitative.  This course introduces mathematical ideas that are useful for understanding and analyzing biological data, including data description and fitting, hypothesis testing and Bayesian thinking, Markov models, and differential equations.  Students acquire hands-on experience working with data and implementing mathematical models computationall

Session(s)

Session II

Introduction to Spatial Data Science

Spatial data science is an evolving field that can be thought of as a collection of concepts and methods drawn from both statistics/spatial statistics and computer science/geocomputation. These techniques deal with accessing, transforming, manipulating, visualizing, exploring and reasoning about data where the locational component is important (spatial data). The course introduces the types of spatial data relevant in social science inquiry and reviews a range of methods to explore these data.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to the Arts of the Italian Renaissance

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course will cover the major themes and works of the Italian Renaissance, including painting, sculpture, decorative arts, and architecture. We will consider stylistic development of the arts from the period of roughly 1300 (late Medieval/pre-Renaissance predecessors) to 1560. Throughout the course we will interrogate the concept of “Renaissance” as a unifying term and examine its relationship to the Medieval in terms of both continuity and change.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia (China)

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This is a two-course sequence on the civilizations of Japan and China, with emphasis on major transformation of individual identity, community, and nation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present. The China course of the sequence will review the broad characteristics of Chinese civilization from its beginnings, with special emphasis on the social, political, and cultural transformations from the nineteenth century to the present. The two courses may be taken separately.

Session(s)

Session I

Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia (Japan)

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This is a two-course sequence on the civilizations of Japan and China, with emphasis on major transformation of individual identity, community, and nation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present. This course of the sequence focuses on Japan from 1600 to the postwar era. The two courses may be taken separately. These courses count toward the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Session(s)

Session II

Introductory Statistical Methods and Applications for the Social Sciences

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course introduces and applies fundamental statistical concepts, principles, and procedures to the analysis of data in the social and behavioral sciences. Students will learn computation, interpretation, and application of commonly used descriptive and inferential statistical procedures as they relate to social and behavioral research. These include z-test, t-test, bivariate correlation and simple linear regression with an introduction to analysis of variance and multiple regression.

Session(s)

Session I

Linear Algebra

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course takes a concrete approach to the basic topics of linear algebra.  Topics include vector geometry, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, matrices and determinants, and eigenvalue problems.

Session(s)

Session I

Mathematical Methods for Social Sciences

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course takes a concrete approach to the basic topics of multivariable calculus. Topics include a brief review of one-variable calculus, parametric equations, alternate coordinate systems, vectors and vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and Lagrange multipliers.

Session(s)

Session I

Mechanics

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This is a three-course calculus-based sequence  in the fundamentals of physics and represents a full-year's work.  Content  is not repeated from course to course.  Topics include classical mechanics, electricity & magnetism, wave motion, optics, and an introduction to heat and thermodynamics.  All labs must be completed to receive credit for the course. Final exams are held on the last Wednesday of each course.  PHYS 13100 and 13200 count toward the general education requirement in the natural and mathematical sciences.

Session(s)

Session I

Models and Methods in Contemporary Documentary Film

The documentary has been undergoing a popular cultural renaissance since the 1980s, when these movies moved out of classrooms and began, more and more, to play alongside narrative blockbusters in movie theatres and as installations in gallery spaces. Unlike fiction narrative movies, these movies featured people (social actors) playing themselves in front of the camera, speaking about their lives and going about their business.

Session(s)

Session I

Nutritional Science

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course examines the underlying biological mechanisms of nutrient utilization in humans and the scientific basis for setting human nutritional requirements.  The relationships between food choices and human health are also explored.  Students consider how to assess the validity of scientific research that provides the basis for advice about how to eat healthfully.  Class assignments are designed to help students apply their knowledge by critiquing their nutritional lifestyle, nutritional health claims, and/or

Session(s)

Session I

Principles of Macroeconomics

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  The course will cover - via theory and basic economic reasoning, as well as contemporary applications and public policy debates - current major U.S. domestic and international macroeconomics issues, including: the determination of income and output, inflation, and unemployment; the money supply, banking system, and the Federal Reserve; federal spending, taxation and deficits; international trade, exchange rates, the balance of payments and globalization; and long-run population and economic growth.

Session(s)

Session I

Principles of Microeconomics

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  The course treats by way of economic theory, quantification, data, applications, and contemporary issues: (a) the behavior and decision making on the part of individuals, business firms, and the government; and (b) the role of choices, tradeoffs, costs, prices, incentives and markets in the American economy. Special attention will be paid to the contributions of Chicago economists/economics to our understanding of microeconomic principles and public policy.

Session(s)

Session I

Psychological Research Methods

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course introduces concepts and methods used in behavioral research. Topics include the nature of behavioral research, testing of research ideas, quantitative and qualitative techniques of data collection, artifacts in behavioral research, analyzing and interpreting research data, and ethical considerations in research.
 

Session(s)

Session I

Public and Private Lives of Insects

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course examines the ecology and evolution of insects, from their early evolution over 350 million years ago to their adaptations that allow them to exploit nearly every habitat on earth and become the most diverse animal group on the planet.  We explore the basic biology of insects that have allowed them to become the largest group of animals on the planet, making up approximately 1 million of the 2 million described species.

Session(s)

Session II

Quantitative Portfolio Management and Algorithmic Trading

The University of Chicago welcomes students with strong quantitative skills to explore opportunities in the field of Financial Math. This course for current undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students in Quantitative Portfolio Management and Algorithmic Trading provides a rigorous introduction to modern applications in Financial Math through an interdisciplinary curriculum delivered via remote instruction by lecturers and industry experts affiliated with the Financial Math MS program at UChicago.

Session(s)

Session I

Self, Culture and Society 1

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  The “Self, Culture, and Society” sequence introduces students to a broad range of social scientific theories and methodologies that deepen their understanding of basic problems of cultural, social, and historical existence. The first “quarter” deals with the conceptual foundations of political economy and theories of capitalism and meaning in modern society.

Session(s)

Session I

Self, Culture and Society 2

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  The “Self, Culture, and Society” sequence introduces students to a broad range of social scientific theories and methodologies that deepen their understanding of basic problems of cultural, social, and historical existence. The sequence starts with the conceptual foundations of political economy and theories of capitalism and meaning in modern society.

Session(s)

Session II

Self, Culture and Society 3

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  The “Self, Culture, and Society” sequence introduces students to a broad range of social scientific theories and methodologies that deepen their understanding of basic problems of cultural, social, and historical existence. The sequence starts with the conceptual foundations of political economy and theories of capitalism and meaning in modern society. Students then consider the cultural and social constitution of the self, foregrounding the exploration of sexuality, gender, and race.

Session(s)

Session IV

Stars

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  At the beginning of the 20th century, two astronomers:  Ejnar Hertzprung and Henry Norris Russell independently took catalogues of stars and plotted their brightness as a function of their color. The result, now known as the HR diagram, was to become one of the most influential diagrams in astrophysics. It showed that, contrary to one's naive expectation, the distribution of stars was highly structured.

Session(s)

Session I

Statistical Methods and Applications

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course introduces statistical techniques and methods of data analysis. including the use of statistical software. Examples are drawn from the biological, physical, and social sciences. Students are required to apply the techniques discussed to data drawn from actual research.

Session(s)

Session I

Survey Data Analysis

This course overviews the way scientific surveys are conducted, the survey data structure, and common techniques to analyze survey data. Students will explore the actual survey data (using major surveys such as the General Social Survey) and look for answers to their research question. Students will learn where to find information about survey data sources and how to conduct analyses for their research project. The course also introduces some online tools and statistical software.

Session(s)

Session I

The Workings of the Human Brain: From Brain to Behavior

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This course examines how the brain generates behavior.  Topics covered include the organization of the nervous system, the mechanisms by which the brain translates external stimuli into electrical and chemical signals to initiate or modify behavior, and the neurological bases of learning, memory, sleep, cognition, drug addiction, and neurological disorders.

Session(s)

Session II

Virtual Ethnographic Field Research Methods 

“Virtual worlds are places of imagination that encompass practices of play, performance, creativity and ritual.” – Tom Boellstorff, from Ethnography and Virtual Worlds: A Handbook of Method

Session(s)

Session I

Visual Language: On Images (Session 1)

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  Through studio work and critical discussions on 2D form, this course is designed to reveal the conventions of images and image-making. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but they are also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content.

Session(s)

Session I

Visual Language: On Images (Session 2)

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  Through studio work and critical discussions on 2D form, this course is designed to reveal the conventions of images and image-making. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but they are also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content. Topics as varied as, but not limited to, illusion, analogy, metaphor, time and memory, nature and culture, abstraction, the role of the author, and universal systems can be illuminated through these primary investigations.

Session(s)

Session II

Waves, Optics & Heat

*Taught Online for Summer 2021*  This is a three-course calculus-based sequence  in the fundamentals of physics and represents a full-year's work.  Content  is not repeated from course to course.  Topics include classical mechanics, electricity & magnetism, wave motion, optics, and an introduction to heat and thermodynamics.  All labs must be completed to receive credit for the course. Final exams are held on the last Wednesday of each course.   

Session(s)

Session IV