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For everyone’s health and safety, Summer Session will not host students on campus for residential programs this summer. Many of our courses will be taught remotely online so that you can still explore your intellectual interests, gain insight into college life, and be a part of our distinctive learning community. We hope you will join us online this summer! Our Summer Session team is here to help via email at summersession@uchicago.edu.

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Pathways in Human Rights

Program(s): Pathways

*Taught Online for Summer 2020*  What are the philosophical and historical approaches to contemporary justice issues? How do laws, treaties, and norms work in practice to protect rights? Through lectures and discussions with affiliated faculty, researchers, and advocates associated with the University of Chicago’s Pozen Family Center for Human Rights, participants will explore these questions through the lens of particular issues in the field. Visits to advocacy organizations, cultural events, and courts and other government institutions will reveal how these questions play out beyond the classroom, and give participants behind-the-scenes access to the rich resources available in Chicago to address human rights on a local, national, and global scale. 

In 2020, the program will focus on three issues:
The prohibition against torture -   In this unit taught by Susan Gzesh (Senior Lecturer in the College and former Executive Director of the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights), participants will look at the prohibition against torture -  as one of the most clearly defined yet frequently violated human rights. Students will learn about the potential and limitations of the modern human rights regime.  Why would a torture regime be tolerated in a liberal, democratic society?  What are the roles of perpetrators, victims, and society at large? Students will meet with torture survivors, clinicians, and NGO representatives.   Materials will include philosophical essays and historical analyses, contemporary court decisions, as well as film and other artistic representations of human rights issues.

-  The rights of immigrants.   In this unit taught by Angela Garcia (Assistant Professor in the School of Social Service Administration, students will examine migration across international borders through the lens of human rights.  Specific issues will include how state policies create and sustain migration flows and the way in which current restrictions on immigration and immigrants curtail human rights.  The class will visit government offices and NGOs focused on Chicago’s diverse immigrant communities. 

-  Labor and Human Rights. In this unit taught by Ben Laurence (Associate Instructional Professor at the Pozen Family Center for Human Rights), participants will look at questions about human rights that arise in the workplace. We will consider the justification of the human right to organize a union and to strike. We also consider attempts to deal with the casualization and precariousness of work with a universal income. What would rights for workers look like that would provide human dignity at work and beyond? Materials will include philosophical essays and historical analyses, contemporary policy proposals, as well as film and other artistic representations of human rights issues at work.

This program is ideal for high school students who want to think critically about human rights and the complexity of finding solutions to social justice issues, both at home and abroad. Participants will develop the research, writing, interviewing, and observation skills that will help them to become better global citizens, who are equipped to understand and intervene in the world around them"
 

Course Considerations

This course is ideal for high school students who want to think critically about human rights and the complexity of finding solutions to social justice issues, both at home and abroad. Participants will develop the research, writing, interviewing, and observation skills that will help them to become better global citizens, who are equipped to understand and intervene in the world around them. Similar courses include Pathways in World Politics.

Discussion Intensive

Course Overview

Current Grade / Education Level

9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade

Program

Pathways

Start Date

June 22

End Date

July 09

Class Details

Primary Instructor

Susan Gzesh

Academic Interest

Examining Culture and Society
Social Sciences (e.g., history, sociology)

Class Specifics

Course Code

HMRT 11000 94

Class Day(s)

Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri

Class Duration

9:00

3:00 PM

Session

Session I

Course Length

3 weeks